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A Prospective Trial of Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Cough

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A Prospective Trial of Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Cough

This study seeks to explore whether heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback can be effective in the treatment of chronic cough. Chronic cough has many causes, including asthma, postnasal drip, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), each with a specific treatment. However, among a subset of cough patients, no clear cause is found despite extensive workup, and traditional treatment methods do not provide relief. Several studies revealed less common causes of chronic cough and disordered breathing such as vagal neuropathy, paradoxical vocal fold motion, and stress. Additional research identified links between the neurological networks that produce the cough reflex and those that maintain normal breathing. HRV biofeedback is a self-regulation technique that uses computer equipment to monitor heart rate and breathing, two key functions of the autonomic nervous system. By using this non-invasive behavioral technique, cough patients can regulate their breathing and autonomic function, potentially leading to improved autonomic balance and a reduction in cough symptoms.

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participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.header-virtual

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No pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-no
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

Behavioral - Voice Therapy

See Arm 1 & 2

Behavioral - Voice Therapy and Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback

See Arm 2 & 3

Behavioral - Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback

See Arm 2 & 3

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participant.views.study.view.scientific-title

A Prospective Trial of Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Cough

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NCT03235466

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DbDLnb