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Intestinal Bacteria and Ocular Inflammatory Disease

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Intestinal Bacteria and Ocular Inflammatory Disease

Background: - Uveitis is a general term describing a group of inflammatory diseases of the eye. The causes of uveitis are not fully understood. Researchers want to look at bacteria in the body that might be related to the inflammation. They will study the natural bacteria present in the gut and intestines of people with and without uveitis to understand their potential role in these diseases. Objectives: - To study the intestinal bacteria in people with and without uveitis or ocular inflammatory disease. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years of age who have uveitis or ocular inflammatory disease. - Individuals at least 18 years of age without uveitis or ocular inflammatory disease to serve as healthy controls. Design: - Participants may have more than one study visit (approximately 2-4) to assess possible changes in microbiome composition associated with treatment or disease activity. - At each visit, participants will have a full eye examination, including vision and eye pressure tests. They will provide blood samples for testing. Participants will also be provided a stool collection kit to take home. The samples may be sent or brought back to the clinic. - Treatment will not be provided as part of this study.

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No pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-no
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

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Microbiome and Ocular Inflammatory Disease

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NCT01859299

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