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Human Oral Detection of Glucose Olygomers

common.study.values.description

Human Oral Detection of Glucose Olygomers

Although salivary contents play a major role in the early stage of food digestion process, their role in taste perception of glucose polymers is essentially unknown. It is hypothesized that the differences in salivary contents, more specifically salivary amylase concentration and activity, influence taste perception of glucose polymers and ultimately eating behavior, which is related to risks in various diseases. The current project is designed to investigate 2 aims. Aim 1 will investigate the variation in salivary contents across individuals and its role in taste perception of glucose polymers. Aim 2 will focus on the role of salivary contents in food liking and disliking.

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participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.header-virtual

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Pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-yes
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

Drug - Acarbose

Acarbose solution will be swabbed on the tip of the tongue to inhibit salivary alpha amylase activity; each swab will contain ~484 microgram acarbose; total maximum exposure of each subject to acarbose will be ~14-30 mg each session (1-20 sessions)

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The Role of Salivary Contents in Taste Perception of Starch and Its Hydrolysis Products

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NCT02589353

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QeZv8e