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Antioxidant Use in Diabetes to Reduce Oxidative Stress

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Antioxidant Use in Diabetes to Reduce Oxidative Stress

Dietary supplementation with antioxidant vitamins, such as Vitamin C and Vitamin E, reduces malformation rates in embryos of diabetic animals. However, human trials exploring the benefits of these antioxidant vitamins have produced unsatisfactory results in trials designed to alleviating diabetic retinopathy, cardiovascular disease, and preeclampsia in pregnancies. The investigators hypothesize that more potent, and better-targeted antioxidants, such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids(PUFA), will be successful in preventing birth defects in the offspring of women with diabetes.

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Pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-yes
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

Drug - N-acetyl cysteine

giving varying doses of NAC in order to determine which reduces oxidative stress.

Dietary Supplement - omega 6 Fish oil ( PUFA)

giving varying doses of PUFA in order to determine which reduces oxidative stress.

Dietary Supplement - Placebo

L-alanine placebo pill to determine if effect is supplement related or random effect.

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Supplementation of N-acetylcysteine and Arachonic Acid in Type 1 Diabetes to Determine Changes in Oxidative Stress

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NCT03056014

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RdGr8b