common.study.topics.clinical

Brain Changes in Fear

common.study.values.description

Brain Changes in Fear

The purpose of this study is to use brain imaging technology to investigate brain changes in people exposed to predictable versus unpredictable unpleasant stimuli. Unpleasant events that can be predicted evoke a response of fear, whereas unpredictable, unpleasant stimuli cause chronic anxiety not associated with a specific event. Information gained from this study may help in the development of more effective treatments for anxiety disorders. When confronted with fearful events, people eventually develop fear of specific cues that were associated with these events as well as to the environmental context in which the fearful event occurred. Evidence suggests that cued fear and contextual fear model different aspects of anxiety. However, studies that examine the way the brain affects expression of contextual fear have not been conducted. This study will use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or Magneto-encephalography (MEG) to compare the brain activity underlying fear brought on by predictable and unpredictable aversive stimuli.

common.study.values.location

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.header-virtual

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.text

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.locations participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.selected

common.study.values.methods

No pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-no
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

Device - Shock device

Electric shock stimulus

Device - Acoustic startle

Acoustic startle for MEG only

participant.views.study.view.additional

participant.views.study.view.scientific-title

fMRI Investigation of Explicit Cue and Contextual Fear

common.study.values.clinical-trial-id

NCT00047853

participant.views.study.view.id

YaOpbx