common.study.topics.clinical

Diet and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

common.study.values.description

Dietary Treatment Study of Fat Synthesis and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

The purpose of this study is to find out how the amount of fat or sugar in a person's diet, or the number of meals eaten each day, affect the amount of fat that people's bodies make, the types of fats in the bloodstream, and how much fat is stored in the liver. The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health.

common.study.values.location

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.header-virtual

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.text

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.locations participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.selected

common.study.values.methods

No pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-no
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

High sugar/meal feed

Weight-maintaining diet relatively high in sugar fed as two large meals daily

High sugar/nibble

Weight-maintaining diet relatively high in sugar fed as 8 meals daily

High fat/meal feed

Weight-maintaining diet relatively high in fat fed as two large meals daily

High fat/nibble

Weight-maintaining diet relatively high in fat fed as 8 small meals daily

High sugar/ 3 meals a day

Weight-maintaining diet relatively high in sugar fed as 3 meals daily

High fat/ 3 meals a day

Weight-maintaining diet relatively high in fat fed as 3 meals daily

participant.views.study.view.additional

participant.views.study.view.scientific-title

Lipogenesis, Lipoprotein Flux, and CVD Risk: Role of Meal Composition and Frequency

common.study.values.clinical-trial-id

NCT02075710

participant.views.study.view.id

ZdPQle