common.study.topics.clinical

Expectation of Unpleasant Events in Anxiety Disorders

common.study.values.description

Expectation of Unpleasant Events in Anxiety Disorders

Fear and anxiety are normal responses to a threat. However, anxiety is considered abnormal when the response to the threat is excessive or inappropriate. This study will examine changes in the body and brain that occur during unpleasant learning experiences in healthy volunteers with high, moderate, and low levels of anxiety. A high degree of generalized anxiety is a component of many anxiety disorders and is regarded as a marker of vulnerability for these disorders. People with anxiety disorders and individuals with high degrees of anxiety have inappropriate expectations of unpleasant events. This study will investigate the development of expecting unpleasant events in healthy volunteers with varying degrees of anxiety using aversive conditioning models. A later phase of the study will enroll participants with anxiety disorders and compare their responses to those of healthy volunteers. Patients who meet criteria for an anxiety disorder, and healthy volunteers who have no history of psychiatric or major medical illness will be enrolled in this study. Volunteers will come to the NIH Clinical Center three times for outpatient testing....

common.study.values.location

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.header-virtual

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.text

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.locations participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.selected

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No pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-no
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

Device - Acoustic startle

Threat condition

Device - Electric Shock

Threat condition

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Predictability and Aversive Expectancies in Anxiety and Depressive Disorders

common.study.values.clinical-trial-id

NCT00055224

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ZdPwbK