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Beta Events and Sensory Perception

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Beta Events and Sensory Perception

Low-frequency brain rhythms in the alpha (8-14Hz) and beta (15-29Hz) bands are strong predictors of perception and functional performance in a range of tasks, and are disrupted in several disease states. The purpose of this study is to investigate a direct causal relationship between low-frequency brain rhythms and sensory perception, and to optimize commonly used TMS paradigms to impact sensory processing and perception in a similar manner as endogenous rhythms. To do so, this study combines human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalography (EEG), non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial magnetic stimulation; TMS), and biophysically principled computational neural modeling.

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No pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-no
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

Device - Online active TMS

One single pulse or triple pulse train (3 pulses, 20ms inter-pulse interval) of TMS will be delivered per trial (at least 5 seconds apart) "online", or during the tactile detection task, at less than or equal to 80% active motor threshold.

Device - Online sham TMS

One single pulse or triple pulse train (3 pulses, 20ms inter-pulse interval) of sham TMS will be delivered per trial (at least 5 seconds apart) "online", or during the tactile detection task. A sham TMS coil will be used that looks, feels and sounds like experimental TMS, but is incapable of of delivering TMS pulses.

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The Causal Role of Neocortical Beta Events in Human Sensory Perception

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NCT04062318

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