common.study.topics.clinical

Acute Effects of Alcohol Use on Chronic Orofacial Pain

common.study.values.description

Acute Effects of Alcohol Use on Chronic Orofacial Pain

Self-medication of pain with alcohol is a common, yet risky, behavior among individuals with chronic orofacial pain. Chronic pain status may affect the degree to which alcohol use relieves pain, but the independent contributions of pain chronification and alcohol-related expectations and conditioning have not been previously studied. This project addresses this gap in knowledge and will inform further research and clinical/translational efforts for reducing risk associated with these behaviors.

common.study.values.location

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.header-virtual

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Pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-yes
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

Drug - Ethanol

A beverage containing dose of ethanol individually determined to raise a participant's breath alcohol concentration up to approximately 0.08 g/dL.

Placebo

A beverage that does not meaningfully increase breath alcohol concentration.

participant.views.study.view.additional

participant.views.study.view.scientific-title

Acute Effects of Alcohol Use on Chronic Orofacial Pain

common.study.values.clinical-trial-id

NCT04019093

participant.views.study.view.id

bmZz9d