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Ross for Valve Replacement in AduLts Trial

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Ross for Valve Replacement in AduLts Trial

This study evaluates two methods of aortic heart valve replacement in adults aged 18-60, the Ross procedure versus conventional aortic valve replacement using a biologic or mechanical heart valve. The Ross procedure replaces a patient's diseased aortic valve with his/her own pulmonary valve and uses a donor valve in the pulmonary position which receives less stress than the aortic valve. Mechanical valves tend to form blood clots so they need long-term blood thinners that increase risk of bleeding and lower quality of life. Animal tissue valves reduce clotting and bleeding risks but wear out sooner and shorten patient life-span.

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No pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-no
Recruiting patients only common.study.methods.is-healthy-yes

Procedure - Ross procedure

The patient will undergo the Ross procedure where the surgeon will replace the aortic valve using a pulmonary autograft (Ross procedure) with pulmonary homograft replacement of the pulmonary root. Identified Ross experts will perform all Ross procedures.

Procedure - Conventional aortic valve replacement

The patient will undergo Conventional aortic valve replacement where the surgeon will replace the aortic valve with another prosthesis which can include a mechanical prosthesis, a stented biological prosthesis, a stentless biological valve or root, or a catheter valve.

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Ross for Valve Replacement in AduLts Trial

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NCT03798782

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