common.study.topics.clinical

Shoulder Pathology and Ketorolac or Corticosteroid Injection

common.study.values.description

Effectiveness of Corticosteroid vs. Ketorolac Shoulder Injections: A Prospective Double-Blinded Randomized Trial

The purpose of this study is to compare the functional outcomes of patients with shoulder pathology treated with either ketorolac or corticosteroid injections, in a randomized double-blinded study. Investigators will compare the effectiveness of ketorolac compared to corticosteroid. Specific Aim 1: Hypothesis 1: Injection of the shoulder (in the subacromial space) with Ketorolac will be more effective than corticosteroid injection for the treatment of a variety of shoulder pathologies. The risks associated with this study primarily concern adverse reactions to the study drugs. The drugs used in this study are not narcotics or habit-forming but can have side effects. The patient's physician will screen for any heart, intestinal, or kidney disease or condition that would increase the chance for the patient to have an unwanted side effect.

common.study.values.location

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.header-virtual

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.text

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.locations participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.selected

common.study.values.methods

Pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-yes
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

Drug - Ketorolac

Group 2 (ketorolac): will receive an injection of 3 cc 0.25% Marcaine without epinephrine and 2 cc ketorolac 30 mg/ml

Drug - Marcaine (placebo)

Group 1 (control): will receive an injection of 5 cc 0.25% Marcaine without epinephrine

Drug - Kenalog

Group 3 (kenalog): 4 cc 0.25% Marcaine without epinephrine and 1 cc triamcinolone.

participant.views.study.view.additional

participant.views.study.view.scientific-title

Effectiveness of Corticosteroid vs. Ketorolac Shoulder Injections: A Prospective Double-Blinded Randomized Trial

common.study.values.clinical-trial-id

NCT04115644

participant.views.study.view.id

dyP37b