common.study.topics.clinical

Recovery of Wounds

common.study.values.description

Comparison of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Versus Conventional Dressings for the Prevention of Wound Complications After Revision THA

Wound complications and surgical site infections following revision total joint arthroplasty result in significant morbidity and cost. To the investigators knowledge, no prospective, randomized controlled trials have examined the rate of wound complications, infection, and reoperation following revision total hip arthroplasty when treated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) versus sterile dressings. The investigators hypothesize that the rate of wound complications, infections, and subsequent procedures in patients undergoing revision THA treatment will demonstrate a statistically and clinically relevant decrease when using NPWT versus sterile dressing.

common.study.values.location

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.header-virtual

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.online-study.text

participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.locations participant.ui.study.affiliations-map.legend.selected

common.study.values.methods

No pharmaceutical medication involved common.study.methods.has-drugs-no
Patients and healthy individuals accepted common.study.methods.is-healthy-no

Device - Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT)

A computer randomization system will be used on the day of surgery to allocate patients to either the conventional or NPWT dressing. Due to the nature of this study, blinding of patients and surgeons to their allocated cohort will not be possible.

Device - Sterile Antimicrobial Dressings

Control group, current hospital standard.

participant.views.study.view.additional

participant.views.study.view.scientific-title

Comparison of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Versus Conventional Dressings for the Prevention of Wound Complications Following Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Trial

common.study.values.clinical-trial-id

NCT03321799

participant.views.study.view.id

vbm5Ab